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bernanke warns congress to avoid the fiscal cliff, saying even the federal reserve doesn't have the tools to deal with the consequences. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. this man has many lawmakers pledging never to vote for higher taxes. find out what grover norquist thinks will happen with the fiscal cliff. >> susie: and hewlett packard stuns investors with news of an $9 billion mistake. >> tom: that and more tonight on nbr! >> susie: federal reserve chairman ben bernanke came to new york city today to send a tough message back to washington-- get your act together. he urged lawmakers and the white house to reach a quick deal to avoid the fiscal cliff, saying it might mean next year could be "a very good one for the economy." ben bernanke didn't endorse any specific tax or spending policies to solve the fiscal cliff, but he urged lawmakers to think creatively. he said an agreement on ways to reduce long-term federal budget deficits could remove road blocks to growth. on the other hand, going over the cliff might mean a recession. on top of that, worries about a deal were already causin
and positioning over the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> would you subpoena a deal that does not include tax rate increases for the wealthy? is that something that's acceptable? >> no. pete: and a candid assessment of the stakes from one of the g.o.p.'s rising stars. >> the fiscal cliff is a creation of the political branch in washington, d.c. and an example of a dysfunctional process. that threatens our economy and millions of people across our economy. pete: is stalemate in washington stifling the economic recovery? joining us this thanksgiving week, peter baker of "the new york times." molly ball of "the atlantic." and jim tankersly of "national journal." >> award winning reporting and analysis. covering history as it happens. from our nationas capital, this is "washington week with gwen ifill." produced in association with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we know why we're here. to chart a greener path in the air and in our factories. to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >>
and the fiscal cliff crisis here in the u.s. stocks fell late today after senate majority leader harry reid said lawmakers are making little progress in resolving the stand-off over tax increases and spending cuts. the dow fell 89 points, the nasdaq lost nine, the s&p 500 down seven. >> tom: as susie mentioned, talks to resolve the fiscal cliff are moving slowly. one reason is that there is deep disagreement over whether entitlement programs like social security and medicare should be on the table right now or not, and the disagreement is sharpest over social security. darren gersh takes a look at why. >> reporter: the number-two man in the senate democratic leadership argues any fix for social security's finances should come after the immediate challenge is out of the way. >> i think we should take social security off the table for the current fiscal cliff and deficit discussion, but be very honest about what we're going to achieve in the near term. >> reporter: republicans pushed back, arguing social security is part of the deficit problem because it is no longer taking in enough in taxes to c
of the taxes scheduled to go up if we go over the fiscal cliff will hit investors. we ask the c.e.o. of utility next era energy lew hay about higher taxes on dividends and stock gains. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! black friday comes early this year. all across the country americans are already lining up outside stores, camping out for the earlier-than-ever start to the holiday shopping season. scenes like this are popping up in shopping mall parking lots. these tents are pitched outside a best buy in tampa, florida, where shoppers are hoping to get the early-bird holiday specials. with big retail chains opening their doors for black friday, on thursday night, there are complaints about companies putting commerce ahead of family time. walmart has been threatened with protests by its employees. the company filed a complaint with the national labor relations board hoping to stop the demonstrations, but the board won't rule on it before tomorrow. diane eastabrook looks at the personal price of thanksgiving day store hours. >> reporter: this is the calm before the storm at a chicago
. >> brown: washington was a-whirl today with more talk of avoiding the much-discussed fiscal cliff. but as november wound down, the president suggested an agreement on taxes and spending could come in time for the holidays. >> i believe that both parties can agree on a frame work that does that in the coming weeks. in fact my hope is to get this done before christmas. >> you know me, i was born with the glass half full. i'm an optimist. >> brown: hopeful signs emanated from the white house and the capitol today, about getting a deal before the new year brings automatic tax hikes and spending cuts. president obama offered his optimism at an event with middle-class americans who'd be hit by any tax increase. >> i'm glad to see-- if you've been reading the papers lately-- - that more and more republicans in congress seem to be agreeing with this idea that we should have a balanced approach. so if both parties agree we should not raise taxes on middle class families, let's begin our work with where we agree. >> brown: one such lawmaker is republican house member tom cole of oklahoma. t
lawmakers and washington aren't able to avert the fiscal cliff? >> we need to respond to this fiscal cliff. i can't tell them how they should do it. that's their expertise but they have to figure out the details and we need to resolve this subject and give america confidence that our political leaders can work together and i honestly believe that that will happen. >> reporter: when you reported third quarter results earlier this month you said you didn't have enough clarity on the impact of superstorm sandy. do you have more clarity now? >> i do have clarity on sandy and frankly it's devastating. particularly on individuals. we had 200 of our stores closed for the first three days of the november period and then many more were closed after that because we didn't have power. we definitely were impacted in a major way at our company. >> reporter: for the current quarter you expect to fall short of wall street forecasts by at least five cents. are you still comfortable with those expectations? >> we try to guide honestly and if we're able to exceed that number that's always good news. but we
cuts at the end of this year. it is what is known here as falling off the fiscal cliff. despite warnings, the global consequences -- and the global consequences of falling off that cliff, can washington he managed -- can washington manage it? thank you for joining me. the markets are looking in america and wondering whether politicians will be able to avoid this fiscal cliff. are things headed that way? but i think eventually they will. the good news -- >> i think eventually they will. the good news is that it is more like a fiscal beach. it is not like the debt ceiling. it is not a sudden that situation. there is a bit more flexibility. but one of the issues emerging is what the attitude of richer americans will be and whether they will accept the need to pay higher taxes. you probably read, as i did today, a very interesting op-ed by warren buffett, who points out that early in his career in the 1950's and 1960's when he was making a lot of money, the tax rate was many times higher than it is today. he is calling on rich americans to pay up. >> is warren buffett and out liar i
, and businesses tend to be more worried about things like the fiscal cliff, they're more worried about the troubles in europe, they're more worried about the slowdown in china. you do have the disconnect. the big concern is which way is it going to go? who is going to win this tug-of-war? so far it's the consumer but let's hope it's not the other direction because as i said, let's hope that the businesses will eventually come around to thinking about things the way consumers are. . >> brown: nancy cohen, i want to come back to you on the question of online shopping and the changed landscape. does the rise of online shopping have a real impact on the economy or is it sort of shifting, transferring, where people buy their things? >> well, that's a very open question, partly because this is so new. the marriage and the magic of online plus brickes and mortar. i mean, there's no question people are visiting online web sites more often than they do stores. whether that adds up to incremental organic growth is a question we just don't know. remember, we're starting with all online sales from
to the same worries about the fiscal cliff. and a new report from the white house added to the worries, showing that unless there's a deal on solving the crisis, the u.s. economy would suffer big time. the obama administration's economists estimate consumers would spend about $200 billion less next year than they would have otherwise. congress and the administration have only a few more weeks to nail down a deal. but that deal will have to address some tough issues, including entitlement reform. darren gersh explains. >> reporter: the big money in entitlements is in health care, and that means any grand bargain to avoid the fiscal cliff will slice away at one of the nation's most popular programs. >> medicare is clearly in the gunsights. >> reporter: it's possible congress and the president could agree to save $300 to $400 billion from medicare by cutting fees for doctors and hospitals. but analysts worry slashing payments won't make the health care system more efficient. >> this is not really a way to structurally change medicare and if you don't change the underlying incentives, you
two opposing views on how to avert the so-called fiscal cliff from representatives tom price and keith ellison. >> brown: then, president obama sat down with mexico's president-elect, enrique pena nieto, this afternoon. one topic for them and for us tonight: the war on drugs, on both sides of the border. >> suarez: as lawmakers talk of reducing the country's debt, paul solman offers a history lesson on centuries of federal borrowing. >> the united states was going into default. we defaulted on many obligations to foreign creditors and to our own soldiers. >> brown: plus, every month, 1,000 young americans are infected with h.i.v., and most of those with the disease don't even know they have it. hari sreenivasan looks at a new report from the c.d.c. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoi
-up demand. can we tell yet? >> one thing i'm worried about is the fiscal cliff issue, the tax increases and spending cuts that take place january 1 unless congress and the president reach a deal. businesses have been worried about that for months. maybe consumers are start-- maybe it's starting to creep into their thinking as well. we saw a weaker consumer sentiment number last week. that's thing to watch to worry about as we wonder what the holiday season will be like. >> brown: nariman behravesh, is it strange or do things really change? on the one hand, we want people to get out and spend, but on the other hand, we still talk about over-spending and spending money people didn't really have was part of the problem that got us into this state in the first place. so what's-- that sounds like a little bit of a disconnect. where are we on that? >> well, i think neil is right in saying consumer finances are in much better shape right now. so in that sense, the kind of spending we're seeing now is more sustainable. it's healthier in a sense. debt levels are down. people are not taking, say,
? >> i'd like to say starting january 1. >> rose: what happens if the fiscal cliff comes and happens? what will it do to our economy? >> i don't think it will do that much because i think people will assume that a solution will be found quite promptly. it's a little like the debt ceiling question. i mean, people know -- the rest of the world may think that we're idiotic at times but they don't think we're going to commit suicide. and so i think if -- i hope something gets worked out before january 1, but if it goes a little beyond that i do not think -- >> rose: so january 10 or -- >> if you guaranteed me that the fiscal cliff we would go past that, i wouldn't sell a share of stock today. >> rose: you have that confidence that in the end they will fix it? >> yeah, and this that think economy works. >> rose: is it getting better? >> it's getting better. it's been getting better since really the summer of 2009. we've had four years straight now where the stock market's given a profit of return. the economy is getting better. we had a tremendous bubble and when it burst it was -- it had
. but all this talk about the fiscal cliff, the automatic tax riders and spending cuts are unnerving people a little bit. and also we don't know how much people have been biging into their savings earlier in the year. so in spite of positive economic news, people are still going to be cautious and that's going to mean a little bit of growth but not a huge amount. >> sreenivasan: barney jopson of the financial times, thanks for your time. >> thank you. >> sreenivasan: thanksgiving is a time to remember native american life and culture. and that was the life's work of edward curtis, a turn of the century photographer. his story is told in a new biography, "short nights of the shadow catcher" by journalist and author timothy egan, a previous winner of both the pulitzer prize and national book award. jeffrey brown has our book conversation. >> brown: in 1896 edward curtis took this photograph of a woman known as "princess angeline," the last surviving child of the native-american chief for whom the city of seattle was named. it was the first in what would become a decades-long project. one of t
and prepare for success. i do think i can offer those insights. >> woodruff: when you talk about the fiscal cliff are the deadline is supposed to be january 1, but you've been out there talking about what can be done about that. among other things, you're saying taxes should go-- in other words, the bush tax cuts should be allowed to expire on everyone under $500,000. which is more than what the president is saying. he's saying it ought to be at 250. yet difference? and have you tukd him about that? >> sure, yeah, yeah, it was over 500, not under 500. yeah, i-- that position, judy, is one that i put on the table a year ago. and i'll tell you why. there isn't anything sort of theological about the $500,000 number. it's just a compromise. the democrats' position has been tax cuts to expire over 250. the republicans' position has been make all the tax cuts permanent. so a year ago i put a of a compromise on the table. if that compromise were accepted, it would raise $500 billion in revenue over the next 10 years, which would take the potential trillion-dollar sequester and cut it in half. and
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)